October Tips & Advice

Lawns

October it is an ideal time to remove moss or thatch, to aerate your lawn and to provide it with a seasonal autumn dressing of weedkiller and a very small amount of fertiliser. This should get rid of any weeds that have built up in late summer/early autumn and keep the grass healthy during the winter months.

You should not need to do as much cutting at this time of the year, but it is often beneficial to do the final cut and leave the grass box off so that the grass clippings can just rot on the surface.
Tulips

October is a good month for planting tulips and they will provide a really good bright display come the following Spring. There are many types of tulips, from hybrid Darwin types to the very low growing species such as Tulipa kaufmannia.

Tulips will require a sunny spot in the border or they may be put in containers. They are usually planted 4 - 5 down in well drained soil or compost. You can buy your tulips from a garden centre or from specialist bulb producers. There are several which advertise in gardening magazines.

Borders

In the garden there will be much to do in the borders, particularly the herbaceous borders. Cut many of the flowering plants back down virtually to ground level. Remove all the stocks, flower heads and suchlike and put them on the compost heap. While you are doing this, it is also a good idea to prick through the border with a fork and to take out any weeds. It will help to aerate the soil. Other borders will also require hoeing and general tidying up with a little bit of cosmetic pruning just to dead-head. The borders will probably need more tidying up as autumn progresses, but October is usually the best time to start.

Leaves & Compost

We start to see the leaves change colour and start to fall this month. Although raking them up can be a chore, these fallen leaves need not be a problem They can all be composted and utilised to help put nourishment back into the garden. There are many pieces of equipment now available to assist in gathering up leaves and being able to then make use of them yourself, rather than having to bag them up and take them to the local tip.

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